Cognitive computers? A reality for IBM

Listening to Dharmendra Modha manager from IBM Cognitive Computing Systems, makes me wonder how far we are from really interacting with cognitive computers. IBM has been able to simulate about 500 billion neurons, 100 trillion synapses all running on a collection of ninety-six of the world’s fastest computers this year. The project  code name is Compass which goal is to be able to simulate a brain of a macaque monkey making of this project, the most ambitious attempted to this day.

Compass is part of long-standing effort known as neuromorphic engineering, an approach to build computers developed by the engineer Carver Mead. The premise behind Mead’s approach is that brains and computers are fundamentally different, and the best way to build smart machines is to build computers that work more like brains. Especially when relating with common sense interpretation, understanding language and sensations.

Whereas traditional computers largely work executing serial tasks (one step after another) and using classical logic (if-while and-or), neuromorphic systems work in parallel, and draw their inspiration as much as possible from the human brain describing functionalities in terms of neurones, dendrites and axons.

If Moore’s law continues to be fulfilled and the number of transistors on integrated circuits continue to double every two years. What would we be able to accomplish in a few years? A growing crew of neuroscientists and engineers believe that the key on building better autonomous machines that emulate brain capacities is by implementing them neurones by neurones. I humbly that there is to much research still to be done on neurones connections and that implementing just neurone by neurone knowing how they are connected isn’t enough to deduce the complete behaviour.

We should better emphasise on understanding how the brain and nervous system works in other simpler species otherwise we could be just trying to mimic something we really don’t understand, time will tell.

The human brain has awesome powers of sensation, perception, cognition, emotion, action and interaction. It can bring together multiple sensory modalities, while consuming less power than a light ball and occupying less volume than a two litter bottle of soda

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Posted on November 21, 2012, in Intelligent agents and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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